From Round to Square (and back)

For The Emperor's Teacher, scroll down (↓) to "Topics." It's the management book that will rock the world (and break the vase, as you will see). Click or paste the following link for a recent profile of the project: http://magazine.beloit.edu/?story_id=240813&issue_id=240610

A new post appears every day at 12:05* (CDT). There's more, though. Take a look at the right-hand side of the page for over four years of material (2,000 posts and growing) from Seinfeld and country music to every single day of the Chinese lunar calendar...translated. Look here ↓ and explore a little. It will take you all the way down the page...from round to square (and back again).
*Occasionally I will leave a long post up for thirty-six hours, and post a shorter entry at noon the next day.

Friday, November 30, 2012

Assignments (4b)—Writing From Primary and Secondary Sources

One year ago on Round and Square (30 November 2011)—Lutefisk Dinner
Click here for the introduction to the Round and Square series "Assignments"
[a] Shorthand RF
Japanese History and Culture
History 210—Anthropology 275
Final Paper Assignment
Writing From Primary and Secondary Sources 

This assignment is broken into three posts. Click below for the others:
Sources 1               Sources 2               Sources 3

Your paper should have a title at the top of the page, followed by a “shorthand” list of your sources.  From there, space down twice and start your essay...(double-space the essay itself).  Examples:

A Week in a Country Jail:
Peasant Uprisings, Social Disorder, and Punishment in late-Tokugawa Japan
Thomas T. Hall
31 January 1970
1. Peasant Uprisings (Tsuchi Ikki, or Do Ikki), 1428 (Lu, 165)
2. (and so forth)

Salt Miner's Daughter:
Family, Commerce, and Rural Migration in Twentieth Century Japan
Loretta Lynn
19 December 1970
1. Free Market and Abolition of Za, 1577 (Lu, 189)
2. (and so forth)
[b] Saigo RF

Heaven Says Hello:
Cosmology, Religion, and Popular Belief in Medieval Japanese Narratives
Sonny James
17 August 1968
1. Nembutsu and the Founding of a New Sect (Lu, 127)
2. (and so forth)

Come Live With Me:
Barbarians, "Otherness," and Foreign Beliefs During the Sengoku Period
Roy Clark
12 May 1973
1. Limitation on the Propagation of Christianity, 1587 (Lu 196)
2. (and so forth)

Somewhere Between Right and Wrong:
Education, Moral Learning, and Proper Conduct in Meiji Japan
Earl Thomas Conley
18 December 1982
1. Education of Children (Lu, 258-261)
2. (and so forth)

HIST 210—Japanese History and Culture
Paper Assignment
Source Paper Checklist

______ Read the assignment carefully and think about possible paper topics.
  
______ E-mail (or stop by and ask) me any questions you may have.

______ Choose six-to-ten sources from an array of materials.

______ Create a provisional title for your paper and e-mail it to me with the sources 
              in the form listed on page two. 

______ DUE NO LATER THAN Monday, December 3 at 10:00 p.m.

______ Carefully (re-)read your chosen sources in light of what you have read and 
             learned from the course thus far.  
[c] Expert RF

______ Write an essay on Japanese society, culture, or politics by relying primarily on those sources you have chosen.  Your "audience" should be very intelligent people (such as your professors in other classes) who know relatively little about Japan.  You are the expert, but you must convey the cultural and historical details you have learned to someone who knows a good deal about academic argument.

NOTE: For this assignment ONLY, you should not make a separate title page.  Center your title at the top of the first page, followed by your sources.  Begin your essay immediately below.  Double-space the text of the essay.  Finally, put the word count number at the very end of the paper.

Due at my office by 5:00 p.m. on Wednesday, December 12

Stylistic Matters 
*Use Chicago-style footnotes or endnotes for this paper (check my style sheet for instructions, and make sure that you know how to use them before you begin writing).

*Although you will list your sources at the beginning of your paper, please include a bibliography that includes the full reference to all of those sources, as well as any others you might use for a quotation or paraphrase in your paper.  
[d] Making history RF

*The sources at the beginning of your paper should be written in an effective “shorthand” that makes it apparent to the reader what you will be analyzing.  The full source reference will appear in the bibliography (see above), as well as in any footnotes you might use.  For example, you should note the chapter or name of the source at the beginning of the paper—just enough to get your point across (e.g. Mary Berry, “Preface”). Please refer to the examples on page two.

*You must use accurate citation, with no mistakes in commonly cited items (e.g. single author books).  Make sure that you master the relevant skills (and practice with your remaining abstracts).  If you need a refresher, check the following website.

Examples of Footnote and Endnote Formats

Items listed in the bibliography at the end of the paper (note that the last name comes first in bibliographies).

Ebrey, Patricia. Chinese Civilization: A Sourcebook. New York: Free Press, 1993.

Mair, Victor. The Columbia Anthology of Traditional Chinese Literature. New York: Columbia University Press, 1994.
[e] Noted RF

Footnotes or endnotes (first reference to a book; note that the page number follows the last comma—there is no need anymore for use of “p.” for “page”). Note the first name/last name format.

Patricia Ebrey. Chinese Civilization: A Sourcebook. (New York: Free Press, 1993), 154.

Victor Mair. The Columbia Anthology of Traditional Chinese Literature. (New York: Columbia University Press, 1994), 617.

Subsequent references to books (there will be many of these for Mair and Ebrey; pay attention to this “shorthand” style). If you have many references to the same book in sequence, you may use"Ibid."—although (seem my style sheet) you are always better off having author and title listed. The problem with "Ibid." is that it does not allow you to add a source at the last minute without messing up your entire citation structure.

Ebrey, Chinese Civilization, 277.
Mair, The Columbia Anthology, 725
Ebrey, Chinese Civilization, 3.
Ebrey, Chinese Civilization, 245 (or: Ibid., 245)
Ebrey, Chinese Civilization, 317 (or: Ibid., 317)
Ebrey, Chinese Civilization, 168 (or: Ibid., 168)
Mair, The Columbia Anthology, 111.
Mair, The Columbia Anthology, 145 (or: Ibid., 145)
Mair, The Columbia Anthology, 315 (or: Ibid., 315)
Mair, The Columbia Anthology, 456 (or: Ibid., 456)

This assignment is broken into three posts. Click below for the others:
Sources 1               Sources 2               Sources 3
[f] Anthology RF

Thursday, November 29, 2012

Assignments (4a)—Writing From Primary and Secondary Sources

One year ago on Round and Square (29 November 2011)—Fieldnotes From History: Spitfire
Click here for the introduction to the Round and Square series "Assignments"
[a] Meiji RF
Japanese History and Culture
History 210—Anthropology 275
Final Paper Assignment
Writing From Primary and Secondary Sources 

This assignment is broken into three posts. Click below for the others:
Sources 1               Sources 2               Sources 3

Read the following assignment carefully and reflect for a few moments upon what historians really do when writing about the past—blending the sources and their analyses into readable and intelligent essay form. Then, using the knowledge you have gained through reading your assignments, choose six to ten documents that revolve around a general theme that interests you, and which you would like to pursue further. Once you have chosen your topic and sources, please e-mail this information to me (see below). The deadline for this preliminary work is Monday, December 3, but I encourage you to send it earlier. Finally, write a medium-length (3,000-word) essay from these sources. The paper is due in my office by 5:00 on Wednesday, December 12.
As you write your historical source analysis, imagine that you are writing for intelligent people who know little about Japan, and that your task is to convey an honest, interesting picture of some aspect of Japanese social, cultural, political, or intellectual life during the periods we have studied. It might help to think of this as an extended reflection on six (or more) different sources, in which you write confidently and intelligently about your understanding of the themes in the documents. Your main focus is the documents, and you are encouraged to quote from them. You should use the knowledge you have gained from general reading and lectures to set the historical context, but you will be judged mostly on your ability to grasp themes in and between the documents you have chosen.  Your balance of primary and secondary sources should be about half and half.

Engagement with both primary and secondary sources are important skills in historical analysis, and this assignment gives you an opportunity to work on them.

Just to get you thinking about possibilities, I have included some possible categories. You, however, will need to refine them as you think about your paper. These categories are intentionally broad, in order to encourage you to choose freely from among a wide variety of readings in your course books and supporting material. Your actual topic will be more focused.
            * women, gender relations, family...
            * rebellion, social disorder, war, banditry, famine
            * poverty, peasants, agriculture, tenancy
            * outcasts, rebels, "barbarians"
            * family life, social organization
            * bureaucracy, taxation, land ownership, government work
            * intellectuals, examinations, ruling
            * religion, spirits, ancestors, ghosts, "heaven...."
            * myths, historical writing, and other narrative prose

[c] Heian rose RF
Remember that choosing appropriate sources is part of the assignment. Part of the skill I am looking for is the ability to choose appropriate sources. The better you know your readings, the better you will do when you choose from among your many class readings and outside readings.

Your paper should be between 3,000 and 3,500 words, or approximately ten to twelve pages. There is usually little to gain by exceeding 3,500 words. If you do, you are likely writing for reasons other than a good grade. If you “need” to write a longer paper (if you are compelled to write thirty pages about Tokugawa economics, for example) please feel free to do so. I will read every word, and comment accordingly. 3,500 well-written and well-argued words will put you in “95+” territory, though, so consider your other classes before using this assignment to begin your doctoral dissertation.

The real problem lies with “minimalism.” Please put enough time into your paper so that you write more than a handful of pages. Papers that under 2,500 words almost always lack development and serious analysis of the sources. I admire efficiency, but don’t assume that it courses through your authorial veins. Papa Hemingway might write a beautiful 1,783 word masterpiece called “The Aged Literatus and the Yangzi River” or “Goodbye to Munitions.” You’re not Hemingway…yet. Write 3,000+ words.

You may consult any other books you deem necessary, but your work will be judged on your ability to write directly from the sources you have chosen. While it is acceptable to choose a source or two from beyond our course materials, my intention is for you to make the most of the detailed syllabus we have studied in this class.This assignment is meant to judge your ability to use primary and secondary sources. It is not meant to be the final word on the subject!

This assignment is broken into three posts. Click below for the others:
Sources 1               Sources 2               Sources 3
[d] Sources RF

Wednesday, November 28, 2012

Syllabic Cycles (1b)—Japanese History and Culture

One year ago on Round and Square (28 November 2011)—Fieldnotes From History: Transportation
Click here for the introduction to the Round and Square series "Syllabic Cycles"
[a] Golden RF
 Japanese History and Culture
History 210 & Anthropology 275
Autumn 2012
TTh 12:00-2:00
Robert André LaFleur                                                             Office Hours:
Morse Ingersoll 111                                                                 Tuesday           4:00-5:30
363-2005                                                                                   Thursday         4:00-5:30 lafleur@beloit.edu                                                                    …or by appointment 

Required Books         
Benedict, Ruth. The Chrysanthemum and the Sword
Berry, Mary Elizabeth. Japan in Print
Bestor, Theodore. Neighborhood Tokyo
Bestor, Theodore. Tsukiji: The Fish Market at the Center of the World
Bix, Herbert. Hirohito and the Making of Modern Japan
Dower, John. Embracing Defeat: Japan in the Wake of World War II
Keene, Donald. Emperor of Japan: Meiji and His World, 1852-1912
Lu, David, Japan: A Documentary History
McCullough, Helen. Classical Japanese Prose: An Anthology
Ohnuki-Tierney, Emiko. Rice as Self: Japanese Identities Through Time
Rupp, Katherine. Gift-Giving in Japan
Souyri, Pierre François. The World Turned Upside Down
Varley, Paul. Japanese Culture
Hacker, Diana. A Pocket Style Manual.
All books are on library reserve

Course Description
This course will examine Japanese history and culture in the context of the wider East Asian world.  We will begin with early Japanese history and the influence of both Korea and China on early Japanese institutions.  We will then examine the development of Japan’s indigenous traditions during the Heian (794-1185), Kamakura (1185-1333), and Ashikaga (1336-1568) periods.  The second half of the course will deal with modern Japanese history and culture, paying equal attention to historical and ethnographic materials, and taking a careful look at the development of the Kanto and Kansai regions in modern Japanese history and culture.  Throughout the course we will use examples from the Japanese language—spoken phrases, the two major syllabaries (hiragana and katakana), and kanji, or Chinese characters—to analyze Japanese history and culture in linguistic context.

Evaluation
Language exercises                    5%    
Quizzes/attendance                   10%
Source Essay                             15%    
Midterm assignment                   25%
Final Exam                                 15%                            
Paper                                          30%    

Daily attendance and class participation are expected; absences during the semester will affect your grade. Late assignments will be penalized. 

History 210 & Anthropology 275
Japanese History and Culture
Autumn 2012
Second Module: Weeks 9-16
[b] History RF

Week IX          
Contemporary Japanese Culture II
Rice, Self, and Samurai
Tuesday, October 23 (Film in Class)
            Kurosawa, The Seven Samurai (七人の侍)
                Part One
                    Part Two
Thursday, October 25
            Ohnuki-Tierney, Rice as Self
                 Food as a Metaphor of Self: An Exercise in Historical Anthropology
                     Rice and Rice Agriculture Today
                     Rice as a Staple Food?
                     Rice in Cosmogony and Cosmology
                     Rice as Self, Rice Paddies as Our Land
                     Rice in the Discourse of Selves and Others
                     Foods as Selves and Others in Cross-cultural Perspective
                     Symbolic Practice through Time: Self, Ethnicity, and Nationalism
Midterm Assignment Due in my Office (MI 111)
By 5:00 p.m. on Monday, October 31st
Click Here for the Midterm Assignment 

Week X           
Late Tokugawa and Early Meiji Japan (c. 1800- c. 1900)
Tuesday, October 30
Keene, Emperor of Japan: 1-209
Thursday, November 1
Keene, Emperor of Japan: 210-415
            Language Exercises Due by 5:00 p.m. on Friday, November 2nd

Week XI          
The Late Meiji, Taisho, and Showa Eras (c. 1900-1945)
Tuesday, November 6
Bix, Hirohito and the Making of Modern Japan: 21-232
                 Part I: The Prince’s Education, 1901-1921
            The Boy, the Family, and the Meiji Legacies
            Cultivating an Emperor                                       
            Confronting the Real World                                 
                 Part II: The Politics of Good Intentions
            The Regency and the Crisis of Taisho Democracy    
            The New Monarchy and the New Nationalism         
            A Political Monarch Emerges                               
Thursday, November 8
Bix, Hirohito and the Making of Modern Japan: 233-530
                 Part III: His Majesty’s Wars, 1931-1945
            The Manchurian Transformation
            Restoration and Repression
            Holy War
            Stalemate and Escalation
            Prologue to Pearl Harbor
            The Ordeal of Supreme Command
            Delayed Surrender           
            Language Exercises Due by 5:00 p.m. on Friday, November 9th


[c] Era RF
Week XII        The Postwar Era
Tuesday, November 13
Dower, Embracing Defeat: 19-275
     Part I: Victor and Vanquished
Shattered Lives                                                  
Gifts from Heaven                                               
     Part II: Transcending Despair
Kyodatsu: Exhaustion and Despair                         
Cultures of Defeat                                               
Bridges of Language                                            
     Part III: Revolutions
Neocolonial Revolution
Embracing Revolution
Making Revolution

Thursday, November 15
Dower, Embracing Defeat: 277-564
                 Part IV: Democracies
                        Imperial Democracy: Driving the Wedge
                        Imperial Democracy: Descending Partway from Heaven
                        Imperial Democracy: Evading Responsibility
                        Constitutional Democracy: GHQ Writes a New National Charter
                        Constitutional Democracy: Japanizing the American Draft
                        Censoring Democracy: Policing the New Taboos
                 Part V: Guilts
            Victor’s Justice, Loser’s Justice                            
            What Do You Tell the Dead When You Lose?        
                 Part VI: Reconstructions
            Engineering Growth                                            
            Epilogue: Legacies/Fantasies/Dreams                                 
            Language Exercises Due by 5:00 p.m. on Friday, November 16th

Week XIII       
Contemporary Japanese Culture III—Early Postwar Reflections from America
Tuesday, November 20
Benedict, The Chrysanthemum and the Sword
            Assignment: Japan
            The Japanese in the War
            Taking One’s Proper Station
            The Meiji Reform
            Debtor to the Ages and the World
            Repaying One-Ten-Thousandth
            The Repayment ‘Hardest to Bear’
            Clearing One’s Name
            The Circle of Human Feelings
            The Dilemma of Virtue
            Self-Discipline
            The Child Learns
            The Japanese Since VJ-Day 

Week XIV       
Contemporary Japanese Culture IV— Urban Anthropology
Tuesday, November 27
Bestor, Neighborhood Tokyo: 1-161
            Introduction                                           
            Miyamoto-cho, a Portrait                         
            The Development of a Neighborhood                     
            Local Politics and Administration             
            Community Services and Neighborhood Events                   
Thursday, November 29
Bestor, Neighborhood Tokyo: 162-268
            Formal Hierarchies of Participation and Power         
            Friends and Neighbors
            The Festival and the Local Social Order
            Conclusion
            Language Exercises Due by 5:00 p.m. on Friday. November 30th
Week XV        
Contemporary Japanese Culture V—Market, Nation, World
Tuesday, December 5
Bestor, Tsukiji: 1-176
            Tokyo’s Pantry                                      
            Grooved Channels                                  
            From Landfill to Marketplace        
            The Raw and the Cooked
Thursday, December 7
Bestor, Tsukiji: 177-313
            Visible Hands                                                    
            Family/Firm                                                      
            Trading Places                                                   
            Full Circle                                                        
            Language Exercises Due by 5:00 p.m. on Friday, December 8th 

Week XVI       
Contemporary Japanese Culture VI—Review
Tuesday, December 12
                        In-class final exam (ninety minutes).

Final Paper Due Wednesday, December 13th by 5:00 p.m.

All Late Work Due by Wednesday, December 13th by 10:00 p.m.
[e] Centered RF

Tuesday, November 27, 2012

Syllabic Cycles (1a)—Japanese History and Culture

One year ago on Round and Square (27 November 2011)—Hurtin' Country: What Mattered Most
Click here for the introduction to the Round and Square series "Syllabic Cycles"
[a] History...culture RF
 Japanese History and Culture
History 210 & Anthropology 275
Autumn 2012
TTh 12:00-2:00
Robert André LaFleur                                                             Office Hours:
Morse Ingersoll 111                                                                 Tuesday           4:00-5:30
363-2005                                                                                   Thursday         4:00-5:30 lafleur@beloit.edu                                                                    …or by appointment 

Required Books         
Benedict, Ruth. The Chrysanthemum and the Sword
Berry, Mary Elizabeth. Japan in Print
Bestor, Theodore. Neighborhood Tokyo
Bestor, Theodore. Tsukiji: The Fish Market at the Center of the World
Bix, Herbert. Hirohito and the Making of Modern Japan
Dower, John. Embracing Defeat: Japan in the Wake of World War II
Keene, Donald. Emperor of Japan: Meiji and His World, 1852-1912
Lu, David, Japan: A Documentary History
McCullough, Helen. Classical Japanese Prose: An Anthology
Ohnuki-Tierney, Emiko. Rice as Self: Japanese Identities Through Time
Rupp, Katherine. Gift-Giving in Japan
Souyri, Pierre François. The World Turned Upside Down
Varley, Paul. Japanese Culture
Hacker, Diana. A Pocket Style Manual.
All books are on library reserve

Course Description
This course will examine Japanese history and culture in the context of the wider East Asian world.  We will begin with early Japanese history and the influence of both Korea and China on early Japanese institutions.  We will then examine the development of Japan’s indigenous traditions during the Heian (794-1185), Kamakura (1185-1333), and Ashikaga (1336-1568) periods.  The second half of the course will deal with modern Japanese history and culture, paying equal attention to historical and ethnographic materials, and taking a careful look at the development of the Kanto and Kansai regions in modern Japanese history and culture.  Throughout the course we will use examples from the Japanese language—spoken phrases, the two major syllabaries (hiragana and katakana), and kanji, or Chinese characters—to analyze Japanese history and culture in linguistic context.

Evaluation
Language exercises                    5%    
Quizzes/attendance                   10%
Source Essay                             15%    
Midterm assignment                   25%
Final Exam                                 15%                            
Paper                                          30%    

Daily attendance and class participation are expected; absences during the semester will affect your grade. Late assignments will be penalized. 


History 210 & Anthropology 275
Japanese History and Culture
Autumn 2012
Week I              
Introduction: Language, History, and Culture
Tuesday, August 28
            McCullough, Classical Japanese Prose: 27-69                     
                        Tale of the Bamboo Cutter           
                        Tales of Ise
Thursday, August 30
            Varley, Japanese Culture: 1-18         
                   The Emergence of Japanese Civilization                    
            Lu, Japan: A Documentary History: 3-20
                        Amaterasu and Susano-o                                         
                        Okuninushi-no-Mikoto and Izumo                           
                        The Eastern Expedition of Emperor Jimmu             
                        From the History of Wei                          
                        Conquest of the Eastern Frontier…
                        From the Engishiki                                 
            McCullough, Classical Japanese Prose: 70-155                   
                        A Tosa Journal                                                                                      
                        The Gossamer Journal                             
Language Exercises Due by 5:00 p.m. on Friday, August 31st

Week II            
Nara and Heian Japan  (710-c. 1000)
Tuesday, September 4
            Varley, Japanese Culture: 19-76
                        The Introduction of Buddhism      
                        The Court at its Zenith                                        
            Lu, Japan: A Documentary History: 21-79
                        The  Seventeen  Article  Constitution, 604 AD
                        The  Reform  Edict  of  Taika, 646 AD      
                        The Administrative System, 718 AD         
                        The Law of the Households                      
                        Preface  to  Kojiki, 712 AD                      
                        From  the  Manyoshu                                          
                        Temmu’s Propagation of Buddhism, 676-685 AD    
                        Sutra of the Golden Light…                                 
                        Erection of Provincial Temples     
                        A  Parable  of  the  Burning  House                                   
                        Directions  to  the  Teachings  of  Three  Doctrines…
                        Ennin's  Diary  of  His  Pilgrimage  to  China
                        Statement  of  Opinion  on  Twelve  Matters, 914    
                        Regulations  Concerning  Trade  with  Pohai, 828   
                        Diary  of  Lady  Murasaki, 1008-1010                    
                        Observations  on  the  Heian  Capital, 982              
                        Daily  Observance, Last  Testamentt…                   
                        How  a  Priest  Put  the  Magic  Incantation
                        About  Aotsune  (Sir  Evergreen)                           
                        How  a  Sparrow  Repaid  Its  Debt  of  Gratitude                 
[b] Debt RF

Thursday, September 6
McCullough, Classical Japanese Prose: 156-250                 
    The Pillow Book of Sei Shonagon            
     A Tale of Flowering Fortunes                               
Language Exercises Due by 5:00 p.m. on Friday, September 7th

Week III         
 Late Heian and Early Kamakura Japan (c.1000-c.1200)
Tuesday, September 11
Souyri, The World Turned Upside Down: 1-100
   The Curtain Rises                                                          
    Social Dynamics of the Late Heian Period               
                        The Crisis in the Late Twelfth Century                  
                        Kamakura: The Warrior Regime                
                        Kamakura: A Society of Questions             
                        Kamakura: A Society in Transformation
Varley, Japanese Culture: 77-109
                        The Advent of a New Age                        
                        The Canons of Medieval Taste                  
Lu, Japan: A Documentary History: 81-116                                                                                      Allotment  Land  (Kubunden)…                            
                        Plan  to Cultivate  One  Million  Cho…    
                        Land  Held  for  Three  Generations…        
                        Private  Ownership  of  Reclaimed  Land, 743
                        Proscription  of  Private  Ownership  of  Land, 765   
                        Privilege  of  Tax  Immunity  (Fuyu), 951  and  953
                        Immunity  from  Entry  by  Public  Officials…        
                        Establishment  of  a  Shoen, 845, 920, and  1042     
                        Commendation  of  a  Shoen                                
Edict  to  Curtail  Spread  of  Shoen, 902
                        Provincial  Governors  Not  Permitted  to  Interfere…
                        Lands  Occupied  by  Private  Parties …                 
Emergence  of  Tato, 859  and 1091                       
                        Management  of  Shoen  by  Tato                          
                        Establishment  of  Myoden, 1000              
                        The  Kondei  System                                          
                        Proscription  Against  Heian  Nobility…                
                        Master  of  His  Retainers, 1114                            
                        Establishment  of  Relationship…                         
                        Rewarding  the  Vassals, 1180                              
                        Proclamation  of  Yorimoto's  Rule  over  Kanto…   
                        Establishment  of  the Samurai-dokoro, 1180                       
                        Building  for  Kumon-jo, 1184                             
                        Establishment  of  Monchu-jo, 1184                      
                        Appointment  of  Protectors and  Stewards…                       
                        Goseibai  Shikimoku--Formulary…                                   
Thursday, September 13
            McCullough, Classical Japanese Prose: 288-339     
                        The Confessions of Lady Nijo                               
Grammar Is Culture—Handouts
LaFleur, Rob’s Style Sheet, 1-26
Hacker, A Pocket Style Manual (selections)
Pinker, The Language Instinct (selections)
Wallace, Tense Present: Democracy, English, and the War over Usage, 39-58
Language Exercises Due by 5:00 p.m. on Friday, September 14th   

Week IV           
Kamakura and Ashikaga Japan (c. 1250-c. 1500)
Tuesday, September 18
Souyri, The World Turned Upside Down: 101-180
                        The Second Middle Ages                                     
                        Warriors, Pirates, Peasants, and Priests                  
                        The Splendor and Misery: Ashikaga and Trade
                        The Splendor and Misery: New Uprisings…           
Lu, Japan: A Documentary History: 117-179
                        Ojo  Yoshu, or  the  Essentials  of  Salvation                      
                        The  Ancients  Not  Necessarily  Our  Superiors      
                        Nembutsu  and  the  Founding  of  a  New  Sect      
                        The  Short  Letter  (Isshi  Koshosoku)                   
                        A  Catechism                                                     
                        On  the  Salvation  of  Women                             
                        Doubts  Expressed  by  a  Believer  of  Nembutsu..  
                        From  the  Tannisho                                           
                        Conversation  with  the  Master                            
                        Nichiren's  Letter  to  Lord  Nanjo                         
                        Efficacy  of  Simple-Hearted  Faith             
                        The  Lotus  of  Perfect  Truth                               
                        Buddhism  with  Japan  as  Its  Center       
                        Jito  Ukedokoro, 1308                                         
                        On  Matters  Relating  to  the  Annual  Rent..
                        Shitaji  Chubun, 1318                                         
                        The  Tokusei  Edict  of  Einin, 1297                     
                        Scribbling  on  the  Dry  River  Bed  of  Nijo
                        Kemmu  Shikimoku, 1336                                   
                        Appointment  of  Shugo, 1336                              
                        On  Matters  Relating  to  Shugo…                       
                        Increase in the Powers of the Shugo                       
                        Adoption of the Law of Sharing Rent, 1352             
                        Shugo-uke (Contract for Shugo), 1402        
                        Contrast Between the Prosperity of Samurai…         
                        Matters Relating to the Sale of Title Deeds to Fields
                        Sale of Hyakusho Shiki on Certain Fields, 1480      
                        A Covenant for the So (Village Governing Assoc.)…
                        Joint Petition by Farmers, 1407                            
                        Substitution of Money to Pay Taxes, 1353 
                        Determination of Equivalent Money Value for Rice   
                        Money Draft, 1468                                              
                        Land Owners and Pawnshops                                
                        Peasant Uprisings                                                           
                        Fighting for Tokusei, 1441                                              
                        Rise of Chi (Market) c. 1415                                
                        Disputes Between Two Za, 1405                           
                        Soryo System of Divided Patrimony                                  
                        A Deed of Transfer…, 1330                                  
                        Voluntary Renunciation of Inheritance, c. 1279        
                        Challenging  Traditional  Authority                                   
                        Seizure  of  Shoen                                               
                        The  Seventeen-Article  Injunction…                     
                        Hojo Soun’s  Twenty-One  Article  Injunction…
[c] Early RF

Thursday, September 20
Varley, Japanese Culture: 109-139
     The Canons of Medieval Taste (con’t)        
McCullough, Classical Japanese Prose: 340-421     
     Journal of the Sixteenth Night Moon          
     An Account of My Hermitage                
     Essays in Idleness
Language Exercises Due by 5:00 p.m. on Friday, September 21st
 
Week V            
Warring States (Sengoku) and Early Tokugawa Japan (c. 1450-c. 1700)
Tuesday, September 25
Souyri, The World Turned Upside Down: 181-218
                      The Sengoku Period                                           
                      The Sengoku Period: Warlords Seeking Power
Lu, Japan: A Documentary History: 180-228                                    
                        Takeda  Shingen’s  Control  of  Kai, 1547                       
                        The  Hundred  Article  Code  of  Chosokabe, 1597   
                        Compulsory  Military  Service  Decreed  by..          
                        Nobunga’s  Destruction  of  Hieizan, 1571              
                        Removal  of  Barriers, 1568                                  
                        Free  Market  and  Abolition  of  Za, 1577              
                        Collection  of  Swords, 1588                                
                        Toyotomi  Hideyoshi’s  Vermilion  Seal  Letter…
                        Nagamasa  on  Cadastral  Survey, 1590                  
                        Cadastral  Survey, 1598                                       
                        Census-Taking, 1591                                          
                        Edict  on  Change  of  Status, 1591                                   
                        Control  of  Daimyo, 1595                                   
                        Control  of  Mt. Koya, 1585                                 
                        Limitation  on  the  Propagation  of  Christianity…  
                        Expulsion  of  the  Missionaries, 1587                   
                        St. Francis  Xavier’s  View  of  Japanese, c. 1550    
                        Cosme de Torres  on  Japanese  Receptivity, c. 1550
                        Alessandro Valignano  on  Japanese  Prudence…      
                        Alessandro Valignano  on  Patience  and…             
                        Alessandro Valignano  on  Sensual  Vices…           
                        Joao Rodrigues  on  Japanese  Craftiness, c. 1610
                        Oath  of  Fealty                                      
                        Laws  of  Military  Households, 1615                    
                        Amendments  of  Kanei  to  Buke  Shohatto, 1635   
                        The  Group  of  Five, 1632                                  
                        Farmers  and  Annual  Tax, 1603                          
                        Sale  of  Land  in  Perpetuity  Forbidden, 1643        
                        Proscription  of  Parcelization  of  Land, 1672          
                        Injunctions  for  Peasants, c. 1619                         
                        Regulations  for  Villagers, 1643                           
                        Regulations  for  the  Residents  of  Edo, 1655        
                        Regulations  Regarding  Lawsuits, 1633                 
                        Regulations  for  Temples  in  Different  Domains    
                        The  Edict of 1635  Ordering  the  Closing of  Japan 
                        Completion  of  the  Exclusion, 1639                     
                        The  Fate  of  the  Embassy  from  Macau…            
                        Renouncing  the  Kirishitan, 1645                         
                        Of  the  Dutch  Trade  in  Japan, 1692                    
Thursday, September 27
            Varley, Japanese Culture: 140-204
                        The Country Unified                                           
                        The Flourishing of a Bourgeois Culture                  
Lu, Japan: A Documentary History: 243-303
                       Natural Order and Social Order
                       On the Unity of Shinto and Confucianism
                       Nakae Toju on Filial Piety
                       Ito Jinsai’s Daily Observance
                       The Heaven-Appointed Duty of Subjects
                       Proposal for Employing Men of Talent
                       Tokugawa Justice Under Confucian Precepts
                       Education of Children
                       From Hidden Behind Leaves
                       The Beginning of Dutch Studies in Japan
                       Japan’s Creation by Amaterasu
                        Excerpts from the Outline of the Ancient Way (Kodo Taiji)
                        Luxurious Living of Samurai, 1816
                        Corruption of Samurai, 1855
                        Family Budget of a Hatamo, 1845
                        Decline in Samurai Morale, 1796
                        Economic Conditions in Edo and in the Countryside, 1798
                        Tax Burdens Suffered by Farmers, 1781
                        Oshio Heihachiro’s Manifesto, 1837
                        Tokugawa Nariaki to Bakufu, 14 August 1853
                        Ii Naosuke to Bakufu, 1 October 1853
                        The Treaty of Amity and Commerce Between the United States and Japan, 1858
                        Excerpts from the Overseas Diary of Lord Muragaki, 1860
                        Recollection of Tamamushi Sadaifu, 1860
                        The Succession Dispute, Yoshinobu vs. Iemochi, 1858
                        Choshu-han’s Reforms of the Ansei Period, 1858
                        Yoshida Shoin’s Prison Letter, 1856
                        Sakamoto Ryoma’s Eight-Point Program, 1867
                        Letter of Saigo and Okubo on the Imperial Restoration, 1867 
Source Paper Due in my Office (MI 111)
By 5:00 p.m. on Monday, October 1st
Week VI          
Tokugawa Japan (c. 1600- c. 1800)
Tuesday, October 2
Berry, Japan in Print: 1-103
     A Traveling Clerk Goes to the Bookstores
     The Library of Public Information
     Maps are Strange
Thursday, October 4
            Berry, Japan in Print: 104-252
                        Blood Right and Merit
                        The Freedom and the City
                        Cultural Custody, Cultural Literacy
                        Nation                          
            Language Exercises Due by 5:00 p.m. on Friday, October 5th

Week VII        
Contemporary Japanese Culture I—Gifts and Exchange
Tuesday, October 9
            Rupp, Gift-Giving in Japan
                        Examples of Giving
                        Strength of Relationship, Gratitude, and Hierarchy
                        Life Cycles
Thursday, October 11
            Rupp, Gift-Giving in Japan
                        Seasonal Cycles
                        Variations in Attitudes toward and Practices of Giving
                        Conclusion                    
            Language Exercises Due by 5:00 p.m. on Friday, October 12th